Gyoza (Dumplings)

Gyoza originated in China and is a popular side dish in ramen shops and tapas-style restaurants called ‘izakaya’. It is served with a dipping sauce made of equal amounts of soy sauce and rice vinegar with a few drops of sesame chilli oil. You can make these dumplings using different fillings such as minced pork, prawns or vegetables only. I usually make a large batch and freeze them as they cook well from frozen. Remember to steam cook the dumplings for longer if you’re cooking them from frozen. Makes 25–30 gyoza (dumplings)

You’ll needGyoza dumplings Fiona Uyema Fused Japanese cooking recipe

25–30 gyoza skins

bowl of water for sealing the dumplings

vegetable oil

80ml cold water for steaming

sesame oil to season

Ingredients:

For the filling

200g minced prawn/ chicken or add more vegetables

100g cabbage, finely diced 1 spring onion, finely diced

1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger

2 cloves of garlic, peeled and grated

3 shiitake mushrooms, finely chopped

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon sake

1 teaspoon sesame oil salt and pepper to season

2 tablespoons potato starch

Dipping sauce

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

a few drops of la-yu (chilli-infused sesame oil) to taste

Instructions:

A: How to make the dumplings

–       Mix all the ingredients for the gyoza filling in a bowl together and set aside.

–       Place the gyoza skins, a clean water bowl, teaspoon and large serving dish on the counter top before you start making the dumplings.

–       Place a gyoza skin on the palm of your hand, take a heaped teaspoon of the filling and place it in the centre of the gyoza skin.

–       Moisten the edge of the upper half of the gyoza skin by dipping your finger in the bowl of water and sliding it along the edge.

–       Fold the bottom half of the gyoza skin over the filling so that it meets the moistened upper half

–       Start to pleat by folding the edges (make one pleat in the middle and two pleats at either side)

–       Press firmly on all pleats to ensure that the ingredients are secure within the gyoza skin.

B: How to cook the dumplings

  1. Heat oil on a non-stick frying pan on medium to high heat.

 

  1. Place the gyoza on the pan and fry until the base of the gyoza is slightly golden.

 

  1. Pour cold water around the edges of the pan and cover with a lid. Leave cooking for 10 minutes or until almost all of the water has evaporated.

 

  1. Remove the lid and continue to fry until the water is fully absorbed.

 

  1. Finally, drizzle sesame oil over the gyoza and fry until the base of the gyoza is golden brown.

 

  1. Serve with the soy sauce and rice vinegar dipping sauce.

Sake Cosmopolitan

Sake cosmopolitan Fiona Uyema fused summer recipeSake is an integral part of Japanese cuisine in the same way as wine is to French cuisine. It’s traditionally drunk from small cups called ‘choko’ and can be served either hot or cold. It’s a popular option for cocktails and has a lower alcohol content than vodka. Asian speciality stores now stock a decent selection of sake, including sparkling sake.

Makes 2 cocktails

Ingredients:
90ml sake

30ml Cointreau

30ml lime juice

90ml cranberry juice

mint leaves to garnish

Instructions:
1 Fill a cocktail shaker with ice, then add all the liquid ingredients and mix well together until well chilled.

2 Serve in a cocktail/martini glass and garnish with mint leaves.

Matcha ice-cream

Matcha Ice cream quick and easy recipe Fiona Uyema Fused summerThis is one of my favourite summer recipes, it’s quick and easy to make at home. You don’t need an ice-cream maker for this recipe and it takes about five minutes to make. So give it a try and I’m sure you’ll be experimenting with different flavoured ice creams once you see first-hand the rewards of making your own.

Serves 8

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons ingredient matcha powder, mixed with about 4 tablespoons water

500ml double cream

300ml condensed milk

1 tablespoon lemon juice

 

Instructions:

1 Using a fork or a small whisk, mix the matcha powder and water together until all lumps are dissolved. Set aside.

2 Whip the cream until soft peaks form.

3 Stir in the condensed milk, lemon juice and matcha mix using a large spoon. Mix well together.

4 Transfer the ice cream into an airtight container and freeze for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Japanese Hands-On Cooking Class May 27th

This is a unique opportunity to learn about Japanese home cooking and it’s wonderful health benefits. During the class I will introduce you to basic Japanese ingredients and where they can be sourced in your local supermarket, speciality store, health shop or fishmonger.

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Throughout the class I will give tips and easy to follow instructions to give you the confidence to start the Japanese way of eating in your home and kitchen. I will share the knowledge I learned from my Japanese neighbours and friends while living in Japan for 3 years. I believe the Japanese diet keeps me well today and helped with my recovery from cancer in 2008.

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This is a hands-on cooking class with lots of fun and interaction, including drinks on arrival and a sit down lunch at the end of the class. Some of the dishes included on the class agenda are sushi, gyoza, teriyaki, miso soup. You can also ask me to include a specific dish on the agenda!

The class is located in the stunning showrooms of Miele Gallery in Citywest Dublin (just off the N7) and takes place on Saturday May 27th  from 10:30am to 1:30pm. Tickets are priced at €65. For enquiries email fiona.uyema@gmail.com or call 0860704052. For bookings go to http://fusedbyfionauyema.com/product/hands-on-cooking-class-27th-may-e65-e20-booking-deposit/

Hope to see you there! Fiona x

In the meantime you can checkout my cooking demos from the SaturdayAM and  SundayAM Shows on TV3 on the link below:

 

FUSED supported by Eatokyo Dublin restaurant

Eatokyo Dublin Sushi Bar Fused by Fiona Uyema soy sauce tabletop condiment

 

I wanted to mark a little success here on my blog. This month I was so grateful to receive support from one of Dublin’s popular Japanese Noodle & Sushi bars “Eatokyo”. “Fused by Fiona Uyema” soy sauces are now available as a condiment on all the tables in Eatokyo. I think it’s so powerful when restaurants support local  food start-ups and appreciate the quality and taste of the products they use in their kitchens and serve to their customers.

Eatokyo has recently received positive reviews from restaurant critics such as Lucinda O’Sullivan and Tom Doorley. I popped over to Eatokyo last week to thank them for their support and to deliver my first soy sauce order to them. Woohoo!! I met Jay the restaurant manager and enjoyed a beautiful lunch with him (everything was so fresh and delicious). You can see the photos I took of my lunch below.

Eatokyo Dublin Sushi Bar Fused by Fiona Uyema soy sauce sushi platter

Sushi platter

Eatokyo Dublin Sushi Bar Fused by Fiona Uyema soy sauce tempura

Ebi (prawn) Tempura

Eatokyo Dublin Sushi Bar Fused by Fiona Uyema soy sauce gyoza

Gyoza

Eatokyo Dublin Sushi Bar Fused by Fiona Uyema soy sauce tabletop

To see more about Eatokyo go to www.eatokyo.ie

Bia Rebel’s Ramen Noodle Shop

P1030335I often get asked to recommend Japanese restaurants in Ireland. Well I think I may have found a little gem and I’m so excited to share it here with all of you. I came across Bia Rebel when they ordered “Fused by Fiona Uyema” soy sauce for their ramen noodle shop. After chatting to co-founder Jenny Holland I was eager to share this story with you.
Bia Rebel Ramen Noodle Shop is a relevantly new venture. At weekends, they sell ramen at St George’s Market in Belfast. The have plans to expand and I’ve no doubt there will be an appetite for it. Bia Rebel’s ramen noodles are hand-made and use high quality local ingredients. It’s a delicious, wholesome meal, in a bowl.
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Bia Rebel is driven by the culinary skills of Brian Donnelly, who worked for Gordon Ramsey, Gary Rhodes and Michel Roux, Jr. in London, and who later was head chef at Thornton’s in Dublin when the restaurant received its second Michelin star.

Brian believes that “the way we have been growing, selling and consuming food for the last 30 years has done a lot of harm, many folks have forgotten what real food tastes like. It’s my job to put the good stuff in front of as many people as possible, so hopefully they’ll start expecting better all round”. I hope you can see me nodding in agreement!
So how did BRamen noodlesia Rebel Ramen Noodle Shop come about?
Brian was inspired by Tokyo’s ramen culture, and by the similarities between traditional Japanese ingredients and traditional Irish ones: seaweed, fish, pork and mushrooms. So he looked for a good local noodle supplier, and not finding one anywhere in the UK or Ireland, decided to make his own! According to Brian, ramen is great because it allows you to create something completely unique, in a single taste.
I’m already planning a trip to try Bia Rebel ramen. I’ll keep you posted!